Frank Schoneboom’s job description has grown a little longer.


With the recent departure of Jeremy Haley as the city of Eldon’s director of economic development, City Administrator Schoneboom has assumed the additional duties.


Frank Schoneboom’s job description has grown a little longer.

With the recent departure of Jeremy Haley as the city of Eldon’s director of economic development, City Administrator Schoneboom has assumed the additional duties.

“Typically, in small cities, the city administrator is the lead in the economic development role, and that’s what will happen here.” Schoneboom said. “I will take that position on.”

The economic development director’s job was a contract position, said City Clerk Becky Dolby.

Haley, a 2005 graduate of Eldon High School, reportedly took a job with an agribusiness company in Nevada, Mo. Attempts to contact Haley were unsuccessful.

Haley’s last day as economic development director was at the beginning of April, City Administrator Schoneboom said.

“He was able to get himself a very nice position outside of the city,” Schoneboom said of Haley. “I’m very happy for him. He’s a good kid. I enjoyed working with him.”

Schoneboom said he has experience in the area of economic development.

“I have good experience with it,” Schoneboom said. “It’s one of those things, I enjoy doing it … trying to sell entities on the community. And I have successful experience with it, too. I’ve managed to do a few things.”

Schoneboom said he was involved in economic development when he worked in Rogersville and Branson.

“And I’ve been doing a little bit of that here, but I haven’t had the successes here yet that I’m hoping to have. The challenge is the economic environment is tough,” Schoneboom said. “As a community, we have to focus on how we’re going to position Eldon.”

The city has lost hundreds of jobs in recent years, with the biggest loss coming in 2008 when electric motor manufacturer Fasco announced it was ceasing operations at its plant in Eldon. Fasco had been the city’s biggest employer, and nearly 400 jobs were lost when the company shut down operations at its plant in Eldon.

Despite the setback of losing a major employer like Fasco, the community has a lot going for it, Schoneboom said.

“One of the things that it offers that is unique to Eldon is that it is not that far from the lake, 15 minutes, and it is not that far from Jeff (City, Missouri’s state capital), 30 minutes. So in terms of a residential community where you would buy a house and raise your kids, that’s one of those things that Eldon can try to capitalize on,” Schoneboom said.

The city administrator said availability of mid-range-priced housing and improvements to Eldon’s infrastructure would be beneficial to attracting new business.

“If we were able to do that, there would be a different view of Eldon,” Schoneboom said. “The whole key is to do two things. One, portray the community in a way that would attract business, be business friendly. The second thing is we would have to have the infrastructure to handle certain things.

“I don’t know how much of a push there was to market Eldon that way (in the past),” Schoneboom said. “And another thing I would like to do as we go forward is see what kind of things we need to do to get in the good graces of the state’s economic development department. We’re only 30 minutes from Jeff City. We need to work those contacts.”

Contact Weekly Standard Editor Jeff Burkhead at jeff.burkhead@lakemediaonline.com.