Speaking from a perspective of my own research, and not in any way speaking for the majority of people at the lake, or for those who read this newspaper,  my opinions are my own. Based on two columns the last few days, the idea seems to be that our Founding Fathers were interested in setting up a government that would be based on religious doctrine.


Speaking from a perspective of my own research, and not in any way speaking for the majority of people at the lake, or for those who read this newspaper,  my opinions are my own. Based on two columns the last few days, the idea seems to be that our Founding Fathers were interested in setting up a government that would be based on religious doctrine.
Since a lot of the original signers of the Constitution were raised in strict Angelican church doctrine, they would naturally base personal opinion on that. Many became less involved in that church as the nation grew, and began to form more liberal views, not losing what personal faith they had.
According to Joseph J. Ellis, who is a Ford Foundation professor of history, the founders created the first “wholly secular state” by insisting on the complete separation of church and state. They also felt that by creating political parties they would allow for continued debate that would not be considered a “treasonable act.”
The things that make this country great are the right to have and voice an opinion different from established religious or government entities, and the right to not be governed from restrictive religious practices you do not agree with. The English church was very involved in policy in Britain, and for that reason and because of poverty, the original settlers came to a new continent, and they endured hardships in a land so very different from the crowded cities they were used to. The founders of this country were logical thinking men of very diverse backgrounds that figured out a way to make it all work.  
Hopefully, we won't set the idea back a few centuries.
Cathy Palmer, Sunrise Beach