Here's a brief recap of the Lake Ozark Board of Aldermen meeting that took place on Tuesday, Sept. 28.


Here's a brief recap of the Lake Ozark Board of Aldermen meeting that took place on Tuesday, Sept. 28.

• The Board of Aldermen will be revisiting their application for special event permits. Several months after officials adopted the policy, there's still questions and concerns over who should and shouldn't fill out the application.
Alderman Jeff Van Donsel said the process currently on the books is too restrictive. The five-page application is required for special events, including concerts and bands, held on private property.
Along with the application, the city also requires a $125 fee, which is usually waived for non-profit groups.
The city implemented the special event permit application in order to get a handle on the number of events going on in the city, particularly the Bagnell Dam Strip.
City Administrator Dave Van Dee said the permit wasn't designed to restrict the number of events, but to keep tabs on the number.
Truly private events, like ones held at homes or are invite-only, don't require a special permit.
Bands held at venues on the Strip, or other small events, usually require extra city services, whether it's police or public works checking on the trash cans, Van Dee said. Those services come at a cost.
Police Chief Mark Maples said a number of special event permits approved recently on the Strip spilled out into the streets, including open liquor beverages.
"As these special events get bigger and bigger, it's going to cause more problems," Maples said.
The police department had four officers working during one shift the weekend of the Bikefest. Luckily, Maples said, it was enough considering the amount of people.
Maples said the officers still ran into problems with enforcing open container laws brought on by special use permits.
"They didn't stay where they said they were going to stay," he said. "No bar could control the amount of people they had."
In the future, though, Maples said extra consideration will have to be given to the amount of enforcement at large events.
Still, the issue boils down to which events held where should fill out an application.
Alderman Don Langley suggested making it a zoning issue dividing it between properties zoned residential and commercial.
A decision wasn't reached Tuesday night. Instead, the matter will be discussed further at another meeting.


• Taking a leap, the Board of Aldermen approved the mayor's four recommendations to the Budget Committee. The four people who will serve on the committee are: Alderman Jeff Van Donsel, Alderman Larry Buschjost, resident Peggy Henderson and resident Laura Edwards.
The committee is responsible for planning out the city's annual budget.
The mayor announced his recommendations on the agenda and asked that it come up for discussion and possible action at a meeting in October. However, the board approved the appointments Tuesday night. By doing so, they said the committee could start working sooner and get a jump start on working the numbers.

• Several points relating to work on Route 242 was approved moving the project that much closer to financing. First, the city approved a contract with Bacorn Enterprises, LLC to serve as the grant administrators. An administrator is a necessary component when working with Department of Economic Development and Community Development Block Grants, city officials said. Bacorn turned in the lowest bid in the amount of $59,500.
The city also opened a separate bank account to be used solely for DED funds. This will help keep the money separate from city funds and will be easier to track.
The last point approved was related to training requirements for contractors on public works projects to make them inline with state statutes.


Contact this reporter at deanna.wheeler@lakesunonline.com.