THE QUESTION: Back-to-school, and the shopping that typically precedes it, is coming up. In the long run, do you think the municipalities that don't participate in the state's back-to-school sales tax holiday end up costing themselves money because people may go elsewhere to shop? (By not participating, we mean they still charge their local sales taxes.)


THE QUESTION: Back-to-school, and the shopping that typically precedes it, is coming up. In the long run, do you think the municipalities that don't participate in the state's back-to-school sales tax holiday end up costing themselves money because people may go elsewhere to shop? (By not participating, we mean they still charge their local sales taxes.)

Holiday is ‘win-win’ for everyone
The tax holiday for school supplies is a win-win tradition that should be continued. Relatively speaking, the amount of tax dollars lost is minimal compared the amount of goodwill marketing achieved both with the parents buying the supplies and the stores whose sales were stimulated by the measure. It also costs the taxpayers less when you consider that not too many years ago, all school supplies were paid for by the schools, which were supported by school district taxes. When I was in school, about all my parents had to pay for was shoes and clothes.
Joyce Everhart-Hoff

Is the item really discussion-worthy?
With all the truly vitally importantant issues facing city, state and country, back-to-school taxes on sales are one that really needs to be discussed? Be careful, Lake Ozark, you're about to lose your “two horse status.”
Jeffery Amsbaugh

Issue goes two ways, I will shop for a deal
It is a double-edged sword. The tax supported municipalities desperately need the revenue, but in this economy, we all need to save every penny we can. Especially families with children going to school. The cities will go on whether they support the tax holiday or not. Families are hurting and I feel they will shop where they can save, (even a little, means a lot). I personally hope that no one shops in any municipalities that does not support the tax holiday. We all pay enough in taxes, so our governments should be able to support a tax break for us, if only once a year. The few dollars a family saves might mean a box of pencils, notebook or new shoes for one of their children.
Dave Grossen

‘Simple incentive’ can drive many
I live in Camdenton, a city that traditionally does not participate in the back to school sales tax holiday.  Yes, I truly believe that cities that do not take part in the sales tax holiday do cost themselves a considerable amount of business. It's just not the small stuff either like notebooks, pens and paper. Most parents buy their kids a fresh set of clothes to start the school year off with. We are also living in the computer age, so some kids are fortunate enough to get a computer or updated software to start  off the year. Many folks are willing to drive 25 miles down the road to save all that money they would spend otherwise in taxes. A day away from local shops usually means a meal or two at a restaurant, so those towns that don't participate are losing money there also. Let's not forget a stop at the gas station for a quick fill up! Who can go into a gas station without getting some sodas for the road? Then there is always a flea market or a farmer's market that you just can't resist stopping by! A simple incentive like a tax free holiday makes people want to spend money in your locality and enjoy everything that your city has to offer.
James R. Hall

Why wait for special weekend?
Some shoppers are going to wait until the "tax free weekend" but since there are restrictions, I think a large percentage will just buy ahead of time.
That's probably why some merchants and communities don't participate.  As far as losing money, I don't think they will lose a significant amount of revenue.
Cathy D. Palmer