Lake of the Ozarks drivers may spot some unusual vehicles headed west on Highway 54 on Wednesday.

Drivers and teams competing in the American Solar Challenge began passing through Eldon, Osage Beach, and Camdenton Tuesday on their way from a checkpoint in Jefferson City to the next stage stop in Rolla. Cars left the previous stage stop in Wichita, Kan, Tuesday morning.

The American Solar Challenge offers universities a chance to participate in a race that is half energy-efficiency science, half Cannonball Run.

On top of watching several futuristic vehicles reminiscent of Star Wars pass through, drivers on Highway 54 can also cheer on a Missouri entry. The Missouri University of Science and Technology (formerly University of Missouri-Rolla) sponsors Solar Miner VII.



Lake of the Ozarks drivers may spot some unusual vehicles headed west on Highway 54 on Wednesday.
Drivers and teams competing in the American Solar Challenge began passing through Eldon, Osage Beach, and Camdenton Tuesday on their way from a checkpoint in Jefferson City to the next stage stop in Rolla. Cars left the previous stage stop in Wichita, Kan, Tuesday morning.
The American Solar Challenge offers universities a chance to participate in a race that is half energy-efficiency science, half Cannonball Run.
On top of watching several futuristic vehicles reminiscent of Star Wars pass through, drivers on Highway 54 can also cheer on a Missouri entry. The Missouri University of Science and Technology (formerly University of Missouri-Rolla) sponsors Solar Miner VII.
Missouri S&T competes against Michigan, Minnesota, Stanford, Northwestern, and Kentucky. International entries from the University of Calgary (Canada), Hoschule Bochum (Germany) and National Kaohsiung University (Taiwan) are also in the field.
The American Solar Challenge consists of seven stages. The solar cars will travel from Broken Arrow, Okla. to Naperville, Ill. by the end of the day Saturday.
At the end of each stage, race officials impound every team’s batteries. Teams are given their batteries at 6 p.m. and have two hours to charge them with solar panels. The batteries are impounded again at 8 p.m. and given back to the race teams shortly before the start of the next stage on the following day.