Johnny Boswell practices what some would consider a grueling tradition. Every summer for the past decade, Boswell has driven across the United States.

Throw in a drive from his home in Mississippi to Oceanside, California and a drive from Annapolis, Maryland back to Mississippi, and Boswell puts 6,000 miles on his vehicle.

The cycling enthusiast does it all in the name of the Race Across America.

 


Johnny Boswell practices what some would consider a grueling tradition. Every summer for the past decade, Boswell has driven across the United States.

Throw in a drive from his home in Mississippi to Oceanside, California and a drive from Annapolis, Maryland back to Mississippi, and Boswell puts 6,000 miles on his vehicle.

The cycling enthusiast does it all in the name of the Race Across America.

Boswell on...

Experience "I started just like what the folks here are doing in Camdenton by running a local time station, so there are lots of opportunities to get involved if you like cycling."

RAAM Officials "We're just like an official in any sporting event, making sure people are being safe and obeying the rules, and that we have a level playing field so there is a fair race for everybody.”

RAAM cyclists must obey traffic laws, check in with time station officials, and stick to the route for all 3,005 miles of the cross-country bike race.

Four-time RAAM solo winner Jure Robic "He has won the race more than anybody has won this race, so he's quite an incredible athlete."

When Robic jumped out to a huge lead early, Boswell had to catch up to the Slovenian and more-or-less serve as his personal official. Boswell first officiated Robic in 2004. This race marks the sixth American endurance race that Boswell has drawn the task of watching Robic. He also officiated races in Europe where Robic competed.

Every year, Boswell gets a very brief tour of the United States.

"Jure will probably do it in nine days. You have to finish the race in 12 days or you are not an official finisher," Boswell said.