An evening of glitz, feather boas and outrageous outbursts make for one "roarin'" night as a cast of players donned their pinstripe suits and sent visitors into a strategic game of "who dunnit?" at Christ the King Lutheran Church's "Murder at the Four Deuces."


With a quick knock on the door, a man pops his head out. It's "Al Capone."

"What's the password?" he asks, his eyes darting from side to side as if others are watching.

"The fat cats are in the back," is said in return, and one admittance is given into "The Four Dueces."

No. It wasn't really Al Capone, and yes, "The Four Dueces" is actually a church, but that was the scene set up as guests left Lake Ozark and entered into the 1920s at Christ the King Lutheran Church's "Murder at The Four Deuces."

An evening of glitz, feather boas and outrageous outbursts make for one "roarin'" night as a cast of players donned their pinstripe suits and sent visitors into a strategic game of "who dunnit?"

Characters, including "Don 'Big Jim' Ravioli," played by Dan Vanderveld and the accountant's wife "Guilda Guiseppi," played by Donna Broccard, set the scene of love, corruption and murder.

"Big Jim" was shot just after 7 p.m. His death fall lasted the length of three tables and required falling onto two people before eventually collapsing on the floor. After which, the bookie "Sly Sleaze," played by Gary Lutker, offered 10:1 odds he was faking it.

Inspector Neville "The Nose" Nutella, played by Bob Beattie, said the murderer was in the room, and at that point, everyone was a suspect or, rather, a person of interest.

"That's a term we'll come up with 60 years from now," the inspector said.

In the meantime, guests enjoyed a cocktail buffet dinner and their choice of non-alcoholic spirits, including a lemonade spiked with 7-Up, while watching the events unfold. They, in turn, played super sleuths in trying to solve the murder.

"U.S. Congressman Darrin Toosteal," played by Paul Leaker, used the buffet line of hungry visitors as a chance to campaign.

"50 bucks a plate," he said, pointing at the food.

After the inspector read and posted all the exhibits of evidence, guests went to work, listening in on conversations and finding clues that led to the killer.

The night was not without more action, as the Congressman and "Slim from Jersey," played by Pastor Ron Lehenbauer were also "murdered," eliminating them from the pool of suspects.

Before the mystery was solved, guests submitted their guesses on slips of paper.

The inspector, having solved the murder, then revealed who the killer was. In the end, it was Cheryl Schmidt's "Rebecca Ravioli," in the church auditorium, with a Colt Model 1903 Pocket Hammerless.

Contact this reporter at jennifer.hollis@lakemediaonline.com.