Another group of Camden County residents added to a long list of what they would like the county to look like in the future at the second public meeting held to gather comment on the Lake Area Master Plan.

So far, the top concerns on people’s minds include water quality, developing pedestrian walkways and bikeways so there are other ways of getting around besides a vehicle and developing the area so it’s more friendly for year-round residents.


Another group of Camden County residents added to a long list of what they would like the county to look like in the future at the second public meeting held to gather comment on the Lake Area Master Plan.
So far, the top concerns on people’s minds include water quality, developing pedestrian walkways and bikeways so there are other ways of getting around besides a vehicle and developing the area so it’s more friendly for year-round residents.
Controlling the pockets of commercial businesses among residential areas is also been a top concern voiced.
Marty Sewell is a senior planner with MACTEC, the consulting firm hired to help prepare the plan.
Sewell said participants at the first meeting, held Tuesday at the Camden County Courthouse, were very vocal about what they wanted the county to look like in 20 years.
The 40 people who attended the meeting Wednesday night at Christ the King Lutheran Church in Lake Ozark added to the growing list of residents’ concerns.
Besides the issues already mentioned, Dick Danowsky said he was there as a representative of the Sunrise Beach Fire Protection District where he is a volunteer.
Danowsky said roads and access to water were two of the top concerns for the district.
“Sometimes we get a call for a fire and it’s down a road so narrow, we can hardly get one engine down,” he said. “Then, with limited access to water and no fire hydrants, we have to haul water in tanker trucks. It makes fighting fires sometimes very difficult.”
On a personal level, Danowsky attended the meeting with his wife Karla to find out if there was a reasonable solution to the growing number of businesses tucked into residential areas.
Danowsky said recently, a nearby restaurant tried to get rezoned to include outdoor entertainment though it was almost completely surrounded by homes.
“We didn’t want to have to fight the noise and the added cars,” Danowsky said.
Although the restaurant lost its case before the Planning and Zoning Commission, Danowsky says he hears the same type of situation going on throughout the lake and hopes the new Lake Area Master Plan can address it.
Commercial developer Pat McNally said he attended Wednesday night’s meeting to keep “a pulse on things.” With several projects in the works, McNally said planning and zoning would greatly impact the way he does business.
He was there to get a better direction of where the plan is headed.
The meetings held Tuesday and Wednesday are just the first in a long process to develop a Lake Area Master Plan.
Besides the public input gathered at the meetings, Sewell said a survey is available online at Camden County’s Web site for others also wanting to express their concerns.
Planning and zoning has been a controversial issue since it was adopted by the county.
By involving the public throughout the process, the people who are directly impacted by the rules and regulations will be able to take a more active role.
The planning and zoning district encompasses the lake and extends up to 5 miles inland.
On the Net:
www.camdenmo.org
Contact this reporter at deannaw@lakesunleader.com