To seek the earth’s treasure caches: What a fun adventure for a family, a group, or an individual to learn about the history of our earth.

Searching for geocaches (pronounced geo-cashes) is just that: a treasure hunting game that is played throughout the world by adventure seekers equipped with global positioning system devices.


To seek the earth’s treasure caches: What a fun adventure for a family, a group, or an individual to learn about the history of our earth.
Searching for geocaches (pronounced geo-cashes) is just that: a treasure hunting game that is played throughout the world by adventure seekers equipped with global positioning system devices.
A Camdenton resident for four years, Gary Braman quenches his thirst for learning local history by not only seeking geocaches, but by creating geocaches within our surrounding counties.
“Geocaching is a great activity for families and individuals alike. I describe geocaching as a high-tech treasure hunt,” Braman said. “I especially like it because it takes me to places that I wouldn’t necessarily find on my own. I live in Camdenton and work for a company out of Scottsdale, Ariz. I geocache under the name of “Fried Okra” and have multiple types of geocaches placed around the lake area and Jefferson City.” Braman said he “focuses on a place of interest with historical significance” to create his geocaches.
Earthcaches first became popular when the military was allowed to release updated GPS information in 1999. The parent organization, Groundspeak, was founded in November 2000. Initial funding for their site was obtained from the sale of 144 donated geocaching t-shirts. The organization promotes several activities including Cache In-Trash Out. Geocachers are dedicated to cleaning up parks and other caching places around the world.
Braman said making the community aware of geocach.com is important. Most local caches are visited by tourists. Few visitors are local residents.
Thus far, he has created geocaches in our immediate area for Decaturville’s meteorite, Ha Ha Tonka State Park, Tonka Hills Restaurant, Toronto Springs recreational area, Bennett Spring’s tunnel, and the Camden County Museum.
These outside adventures are easy to find. Visit the geocaching.com site. Register for a free account. Enter the postal code of the area that is desired to search for geocache places to visit. Enter the coordinates of the geocache into the GPS device. Use the GPS to help discover the hidden cache (container). Then sign the log book that is kept inside the cache. A “treasure” may be taken from the cache, but one must be left of equal value.
The adventurer returns to the web site of the cache and shares stories, photographs, and answers the specific queries that were a part of the geocaching experience.
For instance, at Ha Ha Tonka State Park, Gary Braman asks “How far is it? Mark the landing at the parking lot trailhead of the natural bridge with your GPSr, now go to the railing overlooking the entrance to the river cave and mark that spot. What is the Euclidean (as the crow flies) distance in feet between the two spots? (Give or take of course.)”
Presently, there are eight-nine cache visitor photographs posted on the Web site for the Ha Ha Tonka adventure.
Contact the author at norine@lakesunleader.com