That the lake has a pet population problem is no secret. We are not immune to problems more urbanized locales have, sometimes they take a little longer to get here.

Too many pets is not one of them. Just ask anyone who’s had abandoned animals show up on their doorstep, neglected, forlorn and hungry.


That the lake has a pet population problem is no secret. We are not immune to problems more urbanized locales have, sometimes they take a little longer to get here.
Too many pets is not one of them. Just ask anyone who’s had abandoned animals show up on their doorstep, neglected, forlorn and hungry.
When that unfortunate soul calls the local shelters to inquire about bringing the animals in and are told there is no room, someone else’s irresponsibility has just become their problem.
While area shelters do offer spay and neuter programs and help make them affordable, it alone is not the solution to the problem.
Down in Springfield, the city council is considering making the purchase of a pet proliferation permit mandatory, according to a story by The Associated Press. If you want your animal to have puppies or kittens, you pay a $100 fee; don’t buy the proper permit in a timely manner and you are subject to hefty fines.
That is an interesting – and we’re certain controversial – proposal.
Up in St. Joseph, the city returns half of its $100 fee if the animal is spayed within 30 days.
Would an idea like that work at Lake of the Ozarks? The challenge would be daunting, considering the nature of a dozen lake communities spread throughout three counties, but we think it is an idea that deserves discussion.
The idea behind the fees is to legislate pet owners to be mor responsible, but questions regarding enforcement, collection of fees and fines and others remain unanswered.
Until now, the lake community has dumped unwanted pets on the shelters and turned a blind eye to the problem. That solution is obviously not working.